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Pot professionals hold seminar for anyone interested in the "Canna-Biz"

Pot professionals hold seminar for anyone interested in the "Canna-Biz"

Legal weed took center stage at the Bing Crosby Theater downtown on Wednesday night. Three experts hosted by The Inlander made the trip to answer questions from the public about the opportunities and hurdles ahead.

Matt Cohen, the pioneer of medical marijuana farms called Washington 'ground zero.' Cohen was a consultant for the state with drafting regulations for Initiative 502.

"I like the law in Washington over any other law in any other state or country so far," Cohen said.

Cohen graced headlines in 2011 when federal agents raided his Northern California medical marijuana grow operation, despite actively working with local and state law enforcement to comply with regulations. His hope is that Washington will be positive role model for other states to follow.

"I think the market is going to have an ability to thrive," Cohen said. "It's going to be regulated very tightly, there's going to be a lot of tax revenue. I think it's going to be a successful program."

Area greenhouses ready for business

Area greenhouses ready for business

Spring is finally here, which means it's just about time to get out and start growing, and Green's Greenhouse is one of many 'growing' businesses in the area ready to put your green thumb to good use out in the yard.

In 2012 owners Dan Dunn and Brian Green took a big risk and built a small greenhouse on their property hoping their business idea would grow. Well, a little patience, some good soil and about three years later Green's Greenhouse has blossomed into something that even they didn't expect. Now, they are just working to keep up

"The more word that gets out there the more customers we get and it just keeps growing," Dunn said.

When you're in Dan's business 'growing' is the name of the game. He and his partner Brian invested everything they had into their property out in Paradise Prairie between Spokane and Cheney. Brian's the true expert; his love for plants was discovered as a kid helping in his grandmother's garden. He went on to work in nurseries and couldn't get enough

"I just loved it and my passion just developed from there, I put myself through college and ended up in this, and couldn't be happier. It's fantastic," Green said.

Libraries will trade food for your fine

Libraries will trade food for your fine

Your overdue books could help feed hungry Spokane area families.

This is National Library Week, and in celebrations, Spokane County Library District is holding the 2nd annual Food for Fines event.

For every non-perishable item of food, the district will forgive $1.00 of your fine, up to a maximum of $10.00 per library card. Fees eligible for the program include accumulated overdue charges and fees for damaged items (unless the account is already in collections).

EWU announces new college

EWU announces new college

Eastern Washington University announced a new college Monday. The College of Health Science & Public Health is set to open at the Riverpoint Campus in time for the 2014-15 school year.


“Eastern Washington University has a long tradition of excellence in the health sciences in downtown Spokane,” said EWU President Rodolfo Arévalo. “This new college will elevate our current programs, initiate research in critical health arenas, promote the development of additional health-related fields of study and expand degree options.”

Bloomsday entry deadline draws near

Bloomsday entry deadline draws near

In just 20 days racers will cross the starting line for one of the world’s largest road races, but time is running out to enter Bloomsday. Tuesday is the last day to register by mail before facing the late entry fee.


Paper entries must be postmarked by  Tuesday, April 15th. After tomorrow you’ll have until April 20th to register online. You can also register in person at any Sports Authority until 9 pm Tuesday night.

Intermountain search dogs and handlers back from Oso

Intermountain search dogs and handlers back from Oso

Intermountain Search Dogs most frequently work with the Spokane County Sheriff's Department doing search and rescues. However, when the devastation of the mudslide hit, they wanted to help.

"We looked at the pictures and we kind of thought, oh yeah we know what we're going for, and we got there and it was just like, wow," said Phoebe Duke, of Intermountain Search Dogs.

Just five days after the mudslide they packed up and headed to Oso, to help lead the search in recovering victims.

"That search without dogs would have been pretty much impossible," said Duke.

The dogs and their handlers spent long hours working through the thick mud and debris, that in many cases went up to the dog's stomachs. The dogs were successful in recovering bodies, as well as clearing areas so rescue crews could focus on high probability areas. The search was both physically exhausting, and mentally draining.

"You had to compartmentalize it, and do your job and work, and then when you come home, that's when it's hard when the reality hits you, that was someone's child you were looking for, someone's grandmother," said Robyn Moug, of Intermountain Search Dogs.

Animal experts working to dispel 'dangerous pit bull' stereotype

Animal experts working to dispel 'dangerous pit bull' stereotype

Animal experts are working to change the stereotype that all pit bulls are dangerous, but a rash of dog attacks involving pit bulls this last week isn't helping change that image.

Pit bulls and pit bull mixes are the number one biting dog in Spokane County, but that doesn't explain what's actually happening. SCRAPS reports despite their bad reputation these dogs get adopted all the time.

"This last week has been unusual and I am not sure why," Nancy Hill of SCRAPS said of the recent attacks involving pit bulls. "We were all wondering if it was a full moon."

Every animal SCRAPS re-homes goes through a behavior assessment; Hill said the recent pit bull attacks involved dogs that weren't adopted through SCRAPS.

Before re-homing an animal, SCRAPS uses a method approved by the ASPCA for determining its level of aggression, fear, and other traits that could mean bad news. Dogs are rated on a scale of 1 to 5, with 1 being the perfect dog with no issues while a dog that scores 5 isn't safe to re-home